Archive for the ‘Writing’ Category

Tearsheet – Digital Camera Magazine – The Photo Essay

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

 

Here’s a rather lovely tear sheet from this month’s Digital Camera Magazine. They asked me to write a piece about how to put together a photo essay so I deconstructed (and greatly simplified) the classic Life Magazine formula using several of my old stories to illustrate the idea.

As I say in the piece, the Life formula is much derided these days but I teach it (and use it myself) because it’s so useful.

Just as there are rules in grammar which enable us to convey meaning, this ‘formula’ allows you to use a narrative structure that ‘reads’ in a similar way. There’s a logic and a simplicity to it. In any case, if you know the rules, you can break them – but it’s good to know them first…

 

 

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The Delhi Walla

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Even before we met a couple of years ago, I’d long admired the blog and books of Mayank Austin Soofi AKA The Delhi Walla. He has a forensic eye for all things Delhi (and Proust for that matter). Here’s a recent picture of us in the Indian Coffee House in New Delhi – a place that has been – and remains – important to both of us.

 

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Amateur Photographer Magazine

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

The current issue of Amateur Photographer Magazine features a rather lovely five page spread about my work with a nice interview by Oliver Atwell.

 

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Professional Photography Magazine

Monday, November 16th, 2015

I’m delighted that my new book, The Palaces of Memory is featured in this month’s Professional Photography Magazine. There’s a lovely spread and a really nice interview by Lottie Davies.

 

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A Small Voice Podcast

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

 

I was delighted to be interviewed by Ben Smith recently about my career for his excellent pod cast show, A Small Voice on iTunes.

I ramble on for an hour talking about how I got started, the business and of course, my new book.

Do have a listen here. Or click the image below –

 

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BBC World News interview about my new book

Monday, October 5th, 2015

 

I was delighted to record two live interviews last night for BBCWorld’s Newsday (shown at breakfast time in Asia) about my new book, The Palaces of Memory, my love letter to the Indian Coffee Houses.

You can see one of them here or by clicking the image below.

 

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Tearsheet – Shoreditch

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

 

Here’s a recent tearsheet from Thai Airline’s Sawasdee Magazine of a piece that I wrote and photographed on London’s Shoreditch.

 

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The Palaces of Memory – an announcement

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

I’m delighted to report that my new book, The Palaces of Memory, Tales from the Indian Coffee House will be published in September by Dewi Lewis. See here for details.

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Delhi’s Ghantewala closes

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

 

Over the last five years or so I must have photographed Delhi street food a dozen times for different magazines. I would always however try and steer the piece towards the Ghantewala sweet shop on Chandni Chowk – as much because that gave me a good excuse to try the ladoos and the sohan halwa which was always offered.

I was deeply saddened this morning after reading the excellent Delhi Walla blog that the Ghantewala sweetshop had suddenly closed. According to a piece in today’s Hindu, the current owner, Sushant Jain, said unavoidable personal circumstances – and a drop in profits – had led to the closure. Ghantewala had been around in one form or another since 1790 and legend has it that the Emporer’s favourite elephant used to ring the bell hanging outside the shop to be fed sweets. As so often, the truth behind the legends matter less than the legends themselves: so cities ebb and flow. In recent years it seems that India has rediscovered its food heritage and realised that its culture is wrapped up in more than bricks and mortar. There are numerous Delhi food walks around now and my friend Pamela Timms, (although now recently relocated back to the UK) is the author of the definitive Korma, Kheer and Kismeta wonderful and detailed tour of many unsung street eating joints. The globalisation of food means that I can eat at any number of Japanese or Italian restaurants in Delhi but I should be hard pressed now to taste sweets that link the Mughal Emperor Shah Alam to the present day. What a shame.

 

 

 

Raj who delivers the sweets in the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk.

Raj who delivered the sweets in the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk.

 

Sweets on sale in the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

Sweets on sale in the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

 

Sweets on sale in the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

Sweets on sale in the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

 

Sanjay preparing a fried bread dish in Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

Sanjay preparing a fried bread dish in Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

 

The bell outside the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

The bell outside the Ghantewallah Confectionary shop on Chandni Chowk

 

Nek Chand and the secret statues of Chandigarh

Friday, June 12th, 2015

In 1996 I was assigned by the Independent on Sunday Magazine to photograph and write a story about Chandigarh, a city in India’s Punjab that had been entirely designed and planned along Modernist lines by the architect and planner, Le Corbusier. I first wrote about that assignment on this blog in 2010 – see here.

During that assignment, my driver recommended that I go and visit a rather dubious sounding rock garden that had been created. Bored and irritable under the blazing sun I turned up asking for a chap called Nick – responsible for what I believed was a inconvenience between me and my hotel room. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Nek Chand, the charming elderly man that met me had, in his spare time – in secret – over the last two decades, built the most extraordinary statue kingdom out of waste materials. By the time the authorities had discovered it, it had grown into a 13-acre complex of interlinked courtyards, each filled with hundreds of pottery-covered concrete sculptures of dancers, musicians, and animals. It was extraordinary. The garden had been embroiled in a fantastic tale of urban corruption, vandalism and official obfuscation but like all good Indian fables, right had triumphed and the forces of destruction had been defeated. The garden would become one of the most iconic sights in that city and Chandigarh would become proud of its amateur artist and his bizarre dream. This morning I learned that Nek Chand, one of the world’s dreamers had passed away at the grand old age of 90. What a sad loss.

 

India - Chandigarh - Nek Chand in his Rock Garden.

India – Chandigarh – Nek Chand in his Rock Garden.